Aplscruf's Music Blog

Jackrabbit and Ryan Purcell at Columbia City Theater May 25, 2012

Columbia City Theater, Seattle

Wow, less than a week went by and we got to see another show!  This time, we ventured out of our usual stompin’ grounds and down to Columbia City Theater on Rainier Ave.  It’s a fairly new venue in a very old building, circa 1917.  It used to host Vaudeville shows in its formative years, and was a prominent jazz club in the 1940’s.  The old brick walls, dim lighting and high ceilings gave it a vintage feel.  The beautiful, curtained stage was flanked with ornately carved wood columns.

We got in town a little early and had time to grab some savory appetizers and gelato at Tutta Bella Pizzeria directly next door to the theater.  I highly recommend the meatballs and flatbread.  The salted caramel gelato was pretty fantastico, too.

We then sauntered next door and waited for the show to begin.  There was a bourbon bar at the entrance to the venue and a small bar inside the theater.  After grabbing a bourbon special and Manny’s at the bar, we moved to the theater and sat along the wall with our own candle-lit table fairly close to the elevated stage.  Several benches and small tables lined the walls, but it was mainly open to standing or dancing patrons.

Tony Fulgham of Jackrabbit

Jackrabbit, a beloved Americana band from Seattle, features Tony Fulgham on lead/vocals, Jason Montgomery on guitar/lap/pedal steel, Moe Provencher on bass and Aimee Zoe Tubbs on drums.   Their first full-length album is due in September, but check out their Bandcamp site to listen to their current E.P. and purchase some tunes.

Jackrabbit L-R: Moe, Tony, Aimee, Jason

They started their 10-song set with “I Ain’t Done With You,” which got people in the door and pushing timidly toward the stage.  The crowd was pretty slim for a Friday night, but more people arrived as the night progressed.  It was Memorial Day Weekend, and people tend to scatter all over the state when there is a chance of nice weather.  Next up was my favorite bittersweet jewel, “Throwing In The Towel” followed by “Hurricane,” and the smiling Aimee let loose on the drums.  I love her audacious drumming style.  Tony tried to get the quiet crowd moving and said, “I can tell you’re on your first drink!”

Moe, Aimee and Tony

Tony then picked up his acoustic guitar and played “I’m Sorry” and “Say Goodnight,” which featured sweet harmonies from the girls.  The tender song picked up volume as drums and steel joined in.

A few more songs followed, including “Home Alone” –I wrote down an interesting lyric–It’s good to miss somebody/when you know you’re headed home.  Next was “Around The Bend, with Jason helping out on steel.  The band picked up speed with “Fathers and Sons,” and a lively cover of George Jones’ “The Race Is On,” then crossed the finish line with the rawking “Big Kids” as the crowd cheered and danced.  Yeah, I’m looking forward to September and going to as many Jackrabbit shows as I can until then.

Rawking on “Big Kids”

I always enjoy discovering another new band, but find it hard to venture out of my comfort zone since I tend to latch on to my favorites.  If they’re local, then that’s a bonus.  We were motivated to go tonight mainly to see Jackrabbit, but felt compelled to stay for Ryan Purcell and The Last Round and see if we’d add them to our growing list of local favorites.

Ryan Purcell and the Last Round took the stage to a fairly large audience, although they were still pretty shy about pushing up to the stage and dancing.  The band just released a new album entitled Pick Me Up.  Ryan had quite a magnetic personality on stage.  His raspy voice has been compared to many country artists, but I think he sounds like Jimmy Smith of The Gourds.  He encouraged the crowd to dance and said sternly, “This music will not dance itself.” 

Ryan Purcell and The Last Round

The band has a big honky-tonk sound and is made to party.  Ryan is joined by his brother Evan on guitar/vocals, Peter Davidson on bass, Charley Rowan on keys (make that a double stack) and David McGraw on drums.

Evan Purcell

I enjoyed the band’s frenetic energy, skillful playing and joyful vibe.  The audience responded accordingly, and long before the set was over, the music did not have to dance itself.

Dancing Crowd

Setlist included:

Cover Your Tracks

Happy Hour

Hurricane

Enough (off 1st record – Kick The Dirt)

Long Road (slower, heartfelt)

Closer – Makes You Wanna Cry which included the lyric:  I ain’t never gonna put that bottle down!

Check out Bandcamp to purchase and listen to songs off both albums.

The Tripwires were up next, but we had to head home.  We caught up to Tony Fulgham and said our goodbyes; we reveled in the bliss of another great night of music in Seattle.

More Pics:

Evan and Peter

David

Ryan and Evan

Ryan

Tony

Jackrabbit

Jason

Moe and Aimee

May 28, 2012 Posted by | Americana, aplscruf, Columbia City Theater, Concert Season 2012, Jackrabbit, Music, Ryan Purcell and The Last Round | , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 2 Comments

LIVE REVIEW: THE GOURDS AND JACKRABBIT

Kevin Russell of The Gourds

Check out my review on Randomville!  See below for more pics and more info about the show.

The Gourds, from Austin, TX stormed into town for another rollicking, foot-stomping performance, showing off music from their new CD, Old Mad Joy produced by Larry Campbell for Vanguard Records.  Jackrabbit, who played for Massy Ferguson in Mid-October, opened the show, and once again performed an excellent set of country rock and got the crowd moving.  Click here for a review of their show with Massy Ferguson.  

Tony Fulgham of Jackrabbit


Jason Montgomery, Tony's "Brother From Another Border--Oregon!" on Pedal Steel

Check out Jackrabbit’s website  to purchase their new EP!  Listen below:

Here is Jackrabbit’s setlist from The Tractor show:

What’s a Guy Gotta Do

Fathers and Sons

AZ Death Song

Done With You

Throwing in The Towel

I Know

I’m Sorry

Around the Bend

Big Kids (RAWKED!)

Jason and Tony

It was a pleasure to finally meet Tony and be able to exchange a few words before his awesome set.  We’re hoping to go to his next show in December.

Before The Gourds came on, we met a nice couple from Victoria.  Came down specifically for the show.  They were also at Tractor several other times throughout the year, and saw Los Straitjackets a few weeks ago, too.  I commended them for their long haul across the water and US border to get here.  I’m sure we’ll see them again.  They also enjoyed Jackrabbit and were looking forward to The Gourds.

The Gourds’ show at The Tractor Tavern featured most songs from Old Mad Joy.  It felt more like a rock show than a revival this time around.  Their new music has a 60’s psychedelic vibe, heavy on electric guitar, with psychotropic solos from Kevin Russell.  I could hear The Rolling Stones bleed through some of their songs; especially those from co-singer/writer Jimmy Smith, whose voice sounds similar to Keith Richards.

Jimmy Smith on Bass

Instead of going through a song-by-song description of The Gourds’ very long setlist, I thought I’d take a few paragraphs to explain The Gourds to those who have not experienced their live show.  The Gourds formed 17 years ago in Austin, TX.    They have 11 albums under their belts, and travel the countryside spreading the joy of live music.  They make appearances at SXSW, Bumbershoot, Hardly Strictly Bluegrass, and other festivals.  Their motto: “For the Unwashed and Well-Read.”

Max Johnston of The Gourds

I discovered The Gourds just by chance in 2007 while flipping through the TV channels.  They were featured musicians on Austin City Limits.   I then heard they were touring the Northwest, so  my husband and I made sure to buy tickets and saw them live at The Tractor Tavern in Seattle.  Their show felt like an old-timey revival in the Deep South.  The five-piece band played a variety of instruments, including electric/acoustic guitars, bass, drums, mandolin, violin, banjo, lap steel, and accordion, and Each band member is also so full of life and energy.

Kev, Jimmy and Claude

The Gourds’ original music, written mostly by Russell and Smith, is sometimes complex and so eclectic; it is impossible to categorize their music.  Their songs range from Tex-Mex country rock to Bluegrass to Cajun to something out of a church hymnal.  This latest album has more of a rock influence, although rock riffs and beats are scattered throughout their older music.

I get more salvation from their shows than I ever did in church.  My soul gets a lift, and I feel so alive–so fulfilled after their two-hour set.  They are a full body-mind-and-spirit show.  Each band member brings energy and puts their heart into each performance.  Kevin Russell, co- singer/writer, plays electric and acoustic guitars, harmonica and mandolin.  When he gets into the music, he stomps to the beat, gyrates, postures, poses, and throws his head around like a man possessed–or blessed.

A Grave Moment

The Gourds’ musical energy and rampant joy spills out over the low stage and floods the audience.  They stomp, wail, whoop, jam and generally cause musical hysteria.  When they’re in such a frenzied state, they are a sight to behold.  It is something that is hard to put into words.  The entranced (and possibly chemically altered) crowd responds accordingly, by whooping back, clapping and singing along, dancing and stomping in time.

Max and Keith

They also do a few covers, including T-Pain’s “Let Me Buy You a Drink,” and received some attention a few years ago after covering Snoop Dogg’s “Gin and Juice,” with Kevin on mean mandolin:

At times, their lyrics are perplexing and undecipherable; but it doesn’t seem to matter during their live shows.  They could speak in tongues and the crowd would still embrace each song.

An excerpt from “Marginalized” off Old Mad Joy by Jimmy Smith:

saw this magnanimous bottom feeder look up at me
thought pond scum sucked ‘til i had a bowl of rat soup inside of me
well, it’s pretty good said this cat named Sneezeguard
couldn’t ever crowd his pan always got a proper sear on
just to find out that easily led could actually steer one

Over the years, every set and  show has been unique in some way.  They bring new songs mixed with old, different instruments, and different variations to the songs.  Shinyribs (Kevin Russell’s alter ego on acoustic guitar) might show up and play the opener with a mix of original and covers of old gospel and blues tunes.  The crowd ranges from all walks of life, from cowboys to college students.  The one time I didn’t bring my camera, a girl next to me kept her V-neck T-shirt pulled down pretty much the whole evening and flashed her recently purchased boobs to the smiling band (and others’ cameras).  Not to be outdone, a tall, skinny guy in a yellow T-shirt approached the front of the stage and pulled his shirt all the way up and rubbed his belly and chest, to the roar of the crowd.  That was the same night Jimmy’s bass got knocked over, smashed into the side of a beautiful acoustic guitar and made a big hole in it.

My most memorable Gourds moment this evening was approaching Mr. Kevin Russell at Hattie’s Hat and telling him I was going to review his show.  His response: “Oh, Shit!” I later gave him the ol’ two-fingered stink-eye when he noticed me in the audience, and I mouthed, “I’m watchin’ you!” 

A camera crew filmed the show during their most recent visit.  I asked Max Johnston who they were, and he said he didn’t know; they’ve just been following the band around like a couple of stalkers!  I suspect, with their new Vanguard label, we will see a DVD shortly.

Kevin Bending the Strings and Stalker Camera Man

On this chilly October night, we put our political differences aside and followed Jimmy’s plea to “Occupy The Gourds!”  The Tractor crowd warmly embraced their new music.  The older songs, worked in throughout the set, galvanized the audience who sang and shouted all the words.  My favorite moment came during their three-song encore, where they played “Burn the Honeysuckle,” or Kevin’s “cowboy brag” song, as he calls it.  His mandolin skills and gyrations are mesmerizing.

Here is a polished version of that song with an explanation of how he came about writing the lyrics:

Also, check out another encore song, “Mr. Betty,” by Jimmy, and hear the  Stones influence:

The long, frenzied night of soul-cleansing music came to an end, instruments and T-shirts intact.
MORE PICS!!


November 8, 2011 Posted by | Americana, Concert Season 2011, Jackrabbit, The Gourds, The Tractor Tavern | , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment